Download details

The Reach and Impact of Child Support Grants: Evidence from KwaZulu-Natal (2) The Reach and Impact of Child Support Grants: Evidence from KwaZulu-Natal (2)

This is only a simple document without a file.

In this paper, we examine the success of a non-conditional means-tested cash transfer targeted at poor children under the age of 7 in South Africa.  We assess the reach and early impact of the child support grant in the Umkhanyakude District of KwaZulu-Natal. The District is poor and mostly rural. In 2001, 8% of households had piped water inside their dwellings (Case and Ardington 2004) – in contrast to 30% for KZN, and 32% for the country as a whole (Statistics South Africa, Census 2001). Thirty nine percent of households had no toilet facilities on site. Only 50% of households were connected to an electricity grid. The District is bearing a heavy disease and death burden, associated with the HIV/AIDS crisis (Hosegood et al. 2004). Umkhanyakude is thus precisely the kind of area that the Child Support Grant is intended to reach.

 

Information
Version 2004
Author Anne Case, Victoria Hosegood, Frances Lund